Legends of the Midlands

Legends of the Midlands

The middle part of England is an area of outstanding natural, rugged, beauty. Nowhere else in England will you find such diversity of landscape. Industry has touched it but left it relatively unscathed. Visitors flock to enjoy its windswept expanses and yet, except for a few towns and villages, the area remains surprisingly un-crowded. It is an area steeped in mystery. Shadows of the clouds around the hills with dark forests and old castles are the best material for the haunted stories. It is up to you will you believe in them or not, but you better be aware of what is standing behind you!

The Evil Spirits of Wilington Mill

From 1831 to 1847, the family of the businessman, Joseph Procter the Young, lived in the Wilington Mill. According to the legend, once there was a hut of a witch who has been killed by the people of a nearby village. At first the family lived quietly, and in 1835 the family and the servants began to hear footsteps, strange sounds, voices, and knockings. The bed of children shook, one of the girls saw a head without a body, and dead eyes stared straight at her. The other daughter saw a woman without eyes sitting on her mother’s bed. It seems like there were more ghosts in the house than the living ones: a big white cat, a ghost staring through the attic window, a napkin-like dancing object. And although the mill has long been demolished, locals still avoid this area.

The Ghost of William Field

In 1804, William Wheel, a manufacturer of wooden wheels, hung himself. For more than 40 years, his ghost has frightened the local and curious people who dared to approach his barn. In the 1850s, eleven priests decided to prevent the spirit of the unfortunate hanger and carry out a session of an exorcism. Broken into the hay, the whole action was secretly watched by two young brothers John and James Parks. Before the spirit disappeared, the ghost of William asked to donate either a rooster to it or two mice hiding in the hay. The priests gave the rooster and drove William towards the pond. It is said that in some way he even drove a stake for him to stay in that pond forever.

The Spirit of Darlington Train Station

One winter night of the 1890s, an employee of Darlington train station entered to the lower floor to rest and have a snack. As he warmed up by the fireplace, an old-fashioned dressed man with a black retriever entered the room. He smiled at the employee and, without any warning, hit him in the head. The employee tried to hit back, but his hand went through that mysterious man. The ghostly guest sent the dog, and it bit the leg of that poor man. Then they both left. The employee was trying to follow them with his bleeding leg, but he entered an empty room with no other way out. This story quickly spread throughout the city. The older people said there had been a suicide at that station some years ago. And the strangest thing is that the suicide not only matched the physical description, but also had a black retriever.

The Spirit of Darlington Train Station
The Spirit of Darlington Train Station